Reducing Docker Image Size

With Docker, it’s easy to end up with images many times larger than they need to be. Even if you remove unnecessary files and packages, you’ll still see your image size be much larger than expected. The size of the image may not seem too important to some, but there are many benefits to having smaller docker images. A smaller image will allow you to upload and download the images faster.
LibreCAD Isometric Projection

LibreCAD Isometric Projection Drawing

Even though LibreCAD is a 2D CAD program, it doesn’t mean that everything you can draw is solely going resemble a single flat surface. LibreCAD, along with many other 2D CAD programs, let you switch from an orthogonal grid to an isometric grid. Other than those two projections, other CAD software, such as QCAD, allows you to have planometric, dimetric, cabinet, and cavalier projections. Learn more about QCAD with our LibreCAD vs QCAD post.
LibreCAD Blocks

Using LibreCAD Blocks

Blocks are a very useful aspect of all CAD drawings. A block is most simply described as a drawing inside of another drawing. This allows you to reuse complicated or frequently used components in multiple drawings or multiple times in the same drawing. When you insert a block into a drawing, you can move it as a single item, edit it, and delete it easily without it disturbing other parts of your drawing.
Involute Curve

Drawing Involute Curve in LibreCAD

An involute curve is the curve created if you were to start to unwrap a string around another curve. The reason why you probably want to draw an involute curve is if you’re drawing gear teeth and are also found in compressors. Drawing the involute curve is a little time intensive since there isn’t much automation in LibreCAD to draw the curve. Once you’ve drawn a few of these curves, you’ll get the hang of it and be able to draw them in a few minutes, depending on the length of the curve you need drawn.
LibreCAD vs QCAD

LibreCAD vs QCAD

On the surface QCAD and LibreCAD and every other 2D CAD software is the same, offering the same basic tools, user interface, and supported file formats. The small differences will either have you praising the software developers or cursing them as you spend your precious time fiddling with the quirks. In 2011 LibreCAD was forked from QCAD version 2. In the software development community, forking is the process of duplicating a project and having it be developed by a different group of engineers.